Tagged: radio drama

“Innocent Moon” (radio play)–ready for free downloading and reading

Finally, I have some new work to share with you.  Recently I’ve been moaning about this being a blog that’s supposed to prominently feature my fiction, drama and poetry and, meanwhile, I’ve been debuting very little new material on this site for some time.

But that’s about to change.

Expect a flurry of stuff in the coming days and weeks, the product of many months of labour and struggle on my part.  Oh, I could be one of those hapless dolts who loads every snippet of juvenilia, first draft and/or literary belch & fart on their site, seeking as much scant praise they can garner from sympathetic fellow wannabes.  But I’m afraid I veer in the opposite direction, sweating out short stories over weeks, months, revising and polishing until the very thought of the tale in question makes me want to upchuck.   Which, as you can guess, is an approach to writing that tends to play hell with productivity.

But when I do release something, it’s ready.  It’s been through the meat grinder, Sherron has signed off on it, the end result microscopically examined and painstakingly dissected; I know that story or poem or novel like I know the inside of my own skin.

And that’s what you’re getting whenever I offer new work.

“The Innocent Moon” is my best radio play.  Bar none.  I put all I learned about radio drama into this little beauty.  It’s the one I submitted to the BBC competition.  Kind of hurt my professional pride when I didn’t make the shortlist but c’est la guerre.  It would have been difficult to produce; very complex in terms of mixing as it involves “samples” from dozens of movies and newsclips and songs.  You’ll see what I mean.

This sonofabitch took forever to research and pull together (as documented in previous blog entries).   The final result pleased me beyond measure.  I love the the flow and ebb of voices, the way it fuses together and perfectly illustrates my fascination (obsession?) with all things relating to space.

Click here to download free PDF of  “InnocentMoon

“The Innocent Moon” is dedicated to my chum and fellow writer and moon nut, Ian Sales.

…and to all of us grown up children of the space age.

When the future seemed so bright.

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A Man Under the Influence

images-1Something has gone haywire.

My Muse has taken charge of my summer and is refusing to relinquish it.  Writing a couple of stories for the Esquire fiction contest was supposed to be a warm-up, something to limber up the ol’ wrists and get the synapses firing.  I wrote the first story and the second one occurred to me and a third…and all of them featured a recurring character, this Conrad Dahl fella, at various ages, from 13-19.  I’ve pondered and batted around the idea of writing (at some point) a linked series of stories but had made no specific plans, didn’t even have an outline committed to paper.  Now here I am with three stories–“Twenty-Ten”, “An Insurrection” and “Never, Ever Say That To Me Again”–written for that fucking contest.  One (“Twenty-Ten”) is complete and was submitted with about four hours to spare before the deadline and the other two need at least a week of polishing and I’m bouncing around the notion for a fourth Conrad Dahl story that would (he hopes) complete the cycle.  Which means at least another 2 or three weeks and pretty much the rest of my summer devoted to short fiction.

What about that novel I was supposed to be revising?  What about the filming and recording I had planned, to sample and explore some of the features of this amazing, stunning, paradigm-shifting new iMac (I’m still enamored, can you tell)?

And do you think I can seize back the initiative, demand that my Muse shitcan this story cycle, at least for now, and get back to the novel?  Not bloody likely.  It doesn’t work that way, my dears.  I can’t program my inspiration, channel it with any degree of success.  Not this lad.  And I’m very single-minded, I can only focus on one project at a time; I’m not one of those agile bastards who can juggle any number of novels, article ideas, short stories, what have you.  After I finish this blog entry it will take me the rest of the morning to regain a fiction-writing mindset.  I’ll play lots of music, pace around my office, let every last vestige of this post evaporate away before I’ll be able to return to my regular work.  Get my game face on again.

I have no idea why my Muse has determined that these short stories should be given precedence.  I’m frustrated by this change of plan; I thought I had my summer all figured out.  Matter of fact, this entire year to this point has been taken up with works that weren’t exactly at the top of my list of priorities.  My “Innocent Moon” radio play took me wayyy too long to research and complete, eating up the early part of 2009.  And then I worked on finishing the long version of “First Room” and a short story that will shortly appear on this blog called “Death Threats”.  And now these linked tales.

Grrrrr.

So what happens if my Muse decides to try to try her hand at writing a ballet or a libretto to a fucking opera?  There’s no way of getting around it:  I’d have to give it a shot.  I throw up my hands in frustration, I curse and shake my fist at the sky but in the end I must accede to the wishes of the one who defines me as an artist and person.  I’m a control freak and the act of writing is the only time I let that go.  That can be terrifying, enlivening, thrilling, daunting; like walking a high wire naked, with no safety net and only half the world watching, hoping you’ll fall.  Addictive and sick-making.  Adrenaline-charged and gut-churning.  I often quote Robert Penn Warren, the act and process of writing the pain I can’t live without.

I’m guessing some of you out there know what I’m talking about.

We’ve sacrificed our backs, fingers, even our peace of mind.  All for the sake of following our Muse wherever she takes us:  never without complaint but, in the end, always obedient, wary of offending her fickle, unpredictable sensibilities.

The horrific, unspeakable risk such an attitude might entail…

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“The First Room” (Extended Version)

As promised, I’m posting the longer version on my radio play “The First Room”.   The version that aired nationally on CBC Radio’s OutFront program was drastically reduced and while it still packed a wallop (largely thanks to Kelley Jo Burke’s peerless production), the piece was originally intended to be thirty minutes long.

Here it is, The First Room, full-length and in all its glory.  I’ll leave it up to you, dear Readers, to decide which of the two (long or short) you prefer.

Enjoy…

Gimme That Old Time Radio

images2I love radio dramas.  The “theatre of the mind”.

Yes, indeed.

I’ve had the good fortune to write a number of radio plays and, as has been mentioned, one of them just aired nationally on CBC Radio’s “OutFront” program.

But listening to the old stuff is what really gives me pleasure.  Recently, I purchased a personal CD/MP3 player and, despite my well-documented techno-phobia, was able to hook it up to the stereo in my office.  Thus, over the past couple of weeks I’ve been kicking back after a hard day of scribbling, listening to Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce as Sherlock Holmes and his amiable (if slightly dotty) companion Dr. John H. Watson…I also have the complete “Sam Spade” series starring Howard Duff and the four-disk dramatization of Les Miserables, produced and starring the one and only Orson Welles.

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Radio, in its heyday, presented news, live sports, game shows and various types of entertainment, from comedy revues to adaptations of classic works of literature.

Now we have “talk radio”, Howard Stern and the shock jocks and “classic” stations playing the same tired playlist of golden oldies.  Even the venerable CBC has dumbed itself down in the past five years, desperately seeking a younger demographic and losing its traditional listeners in the bargain.

It breaks my heart when I think of a time when the folks at CBC used to let the likes of Glenn Gould have the run of the place, accommodating his odd lifestyle by letting him come in and record and mix at any hour, working meticulously to create material like “The Idea of the North”, which I managed to snag on long playing record a number of years ago.

The Mother Corp. once had a dedicated radio drama arm in the good ol’ days but not any more.  They no longer consider it part of their purview to develop young writers and there is currently no equivalent of  “CBC Playhouse“…and that’s too bad.

dimensionI have, I confess, a particular soft spot for science fiction on the radio and I’ve been fortunate to find a couple of sites (check out this one and Calfkiller is fun too) where you can find shows like Dimension X and X Minus One, Mindwebs and others. Fun adaptations of classics of the genre by the likes of Arthur C, Clarke, Philip K. Dick, Ray Bradbury, J.G. Ballard, Henry Kuttner, etc.  Once I figure out how to create MP3’s of these beauties, I’ll be able to listen to them up in my office as opposed to being relegated to the family computer down on the main floor, where I have to queue up, vying for time with my two sons (both of them World of Warcraft junkies, as well as using said PC for their homework and designing their own computer games).  The computer I use for my writing is an old Mac, too old and decrepit for cyberspace, a word processor plain and simple.

The nice thing about the sites I’ve just mentioned is that you can listen to the programs for absolutely nuttin’ and, believe me, you will be entertained.

Listening to a radio drama requires the listener to visualize an entire universe being created purely with words and sound effects.  It’s the perfect format to enliven long car trips and commutes.  Thanks to the internet, these programs live again, a case where state of the art technology enables us to access an art form that is, sadly, little known and certainly under-appreciated.

holmesI will continue to write radio plays and when the time comes that no one airs them, I will produce them myself, through podcasts.  I love the special limits and demands radio drama imposes on writers and can never quite suppress the shiver of excitement I feel when I hear an announcer introducing Lux Radio Theatre’s production of To Have and Have Not, starring Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall, or Petri Wine presenting “The New Adventures of Sherlock Holmes”.

I feel sorry for anyone who’s never heard a really well-rendered radio play. It is an experience not to be missed…and yet so many do.

Shame…

Listen to “The First Room” CBC Radio (Now Available!)

My radio play “The First Room” has been posted on CBC Radio’s “OutFront” site.  You can listen to it by clicking here.

The “official” broadcast date and time (Friday, February 6th; 8:43 p.m.) remain the same but for those of you unable to tune in then, here’s your chance to listen to the finest radio adaptation of my work yet.  The recording will likely be archived for a short while so please spread the word to one and all.

Let me know what you think…

(Note:  A couple of listeners have complained that they’re having trouble with the RealAudio player CBC Radio is employing.  My buddy Phil converted the program to an MP3 and it played like a charm.  So if any of you are more, ah, technically enabled, you might want to give that a try.)

“The First Room”, CBC Radio “OutFront”

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Okay, Kelley Jo Burke,  producer of my adapted radio play “The First Room”,  just  e-mailed me with the date and time it will air on CBC Radio’s OutFront program.

OutFront is a nationally broadcast program so this is a real coup for me.  What makes it triply pleasing is that Kelley Jo has done a brilliant job with the piece, blending and cross-cutting the voices, creating a powerful and intense listening experience.  I listened to the final mix she sent me about ten days ago and was absolutely gobsmacked.

I don’t write memoir, detest it as a vehicle for whinging, suck-ass apologists who’ve fucked up their lives and expect our sympathy for their travails.  Or else they lie and embroider to lure in more suckers.

“The First Room” is not factually true but it is emotionally accurate and that’s an important distinction.

I hope you’ll get a chance to tune in–either listening to your radio at the appointed hour or streaming it from CBC.  As well, Sirius Satellite (137) will be broadcasting “The First Room” throughout North America.  I believe there’s also a podcast.

“The First Room” airs from coast to coast to coast Friday, February 6th at 8:43 p.m.  For further information, here’s a link to the “OutFront” page.

If you do manage to catch it, drop me a line afterward with your thoughts.

I’d appreciate hearing from you.

On Despair

The deaths of Thomas Disch and, more recently, David Foster Wallace have been preying on my mind of late. Both these fine authors took their own lives and while the circumstances might have been different, the reason was the same:

Despair.

Writing is not easy work. I’ve talked about the physical toll it has taken on my body, the arthritis, shoulder and back pain, daily stomach cramps.  But I’ve shied away from alluding to those days when my spirit isn’t in it, when I feel the words and desire to express myself slipping away…until my head is filled with static…and then nothing at all.

The words won’t come. My pen is on the page but there’s no impetus, nothing to get it moving and the page remains blank. Those are terrible, awful days to endure.  I try to tell myself I’m going through a fallow period, that I must use this opportunity to recharge but the problem is I’m a writing machine, composing prose is an addiction, so when inspiration dries up, it’s like I go through withdrawal symptoms.  I can’t eat, can’t read or focus on a movie.  I’m restless, endlessly pacing, trying to relieve this frantic energy that builds and builds with no way to release it.

I snap at Sherron and my boys, pull away from them, duck into my office so I don’t say anything I’ll have to apologize for later.  Little things send me into a towering rage.

And…I despair. Terrify myself by imagining a scenario where I never write again, a permanent writer’s block. That would kill me.  It might take awhile but it would.  No question.

I could never be a suicide, I just don’t have it within me. I’ve always joked I’m more likely to become homicidal than suicidal and that’s not far off the mark. Those rages really are unsettling to experience. I can feel the ghost of my drunken Irish father stirring within me.  All my life I’ve feared my anger, what it makes me capable of. If I ever got in a serious fist fight, I’m not convinced I could make myself stop.  I have dreams where I’m beating and beating and beating on someone until my arms are slippery with blood.

Nasty, eh?  Well, I’ve got nasty genes.  Lots of addiction, violence, lack of impulse control.

The radio play I just finished for CBC Radio, “The First Room”, delves into some of this. Those early memories of lying in bed, listening to my parents drink and get into wild, violent altercations. Writing about it brought all sorts of suppressed memories to the surface and it wasn’t pleasant.  But it also gave me important insights into the obsession I have to control every aspect of my life.  It traces back to those feelings of utter helplessness and terror I experienced as I laid there, convinced my father was going to murder my mother…and then do the same to his kids.  And my bed was nearest to the stairs

As I got older, I wanted to put myself in a place where I could never be threatened or intimidated or controlled ever again.  That applied to every aspect of my life but most especially my writing. I have warned editors that I will beat the mortal piss out of them if they touched a word of my manuscript. I have told agents in no uncertain terms that I do not need their help in directing my career, choosing projects for me, lining me up to write some awful fucking six or eight or ten book series or media tie-in.

I won’t be anybody’s whore, not for any price. No rationalizations, no excuses (“I wanted to write a STAR WARS novel because I thought I could do something really different with Boba Fett’s character”–fuck you!). I don’t work for money and if that’s your focus, if you’re using your pathetic, puny talent in an effort to be the next Stephanie Meyer or Kevin J. Anderson, I spit in your face.

As a result of this stance, needless to say, I’ve become a literary pariah, earning the reputation for being difficult, uncooperative, arrogant, even dangerous.

And…I have succeeded in isolating myself, probably scuppered any chance at success or publication. Far inferior authors are seeing their books in print, stocked in the best book stores, plucked out and carried off by the readers I revere and covet so much.

So in the midst of not writing I’m forced to wonder if it’s even worth writing.  That’s tough.

But just when it seems I’ve reached the end of my rope, something always happens. A voice whispering a character name, a title, a line of dialogue…and I’m off again. There’s a lovely Pete Townshend song on his album All The Best Cowboys Have Chinese Eyes. The tune is “Somebody Saved me” and I often think about certain lines when I’m going through one of my funks. Pick up the disk sometime, it’s as good as anything Pete ever did with the Who.

What happens when the voice no longer comes?  Not for days…weeks…months…years…

What if nobody saves me?

What if there’s nobody there?

Despair.

The sound of no one clapping.

No sound at all.

The silence of the grave.

Please, God, may that never, ever happen to me…