Resisting Biography

breakwaterTo me, it’s not about telling my story, it’s about telling a good story, one that isn’t (at least) twice told.

I suppose it’s understandable that young and developing writers mine personal experience for inspiration, borrow from real life for key characters, settings and episodes in their narratives.

But sooner or later, if you want to be taken seriously as a writer, you have to abandon this rather narcissistic approach and begin to invent, extrapolate, imagine, conflate, collage, transpose. Eschewing a slavish imitation to the “facts”, finding the courage and tenacity to follow a story no matter what strange paths and nooks it might choose.

For a good many authors, the idea of leaving their safe, tidy, self-appointed microverse and venturing Outside is too terrifying to ponder. Their protagonists thinly disguised versions of themselves, storylines and essential details paralleling their own life arc. To these literalists, their writing is a chance at redemption, to make sure their viewpoint is somehow vindicated and wins out in the end. Writing is not an act of imagination, it is a form of exoneration. But is such a mindset healthy—for them or for literature? I would offer a firm “No”, on both counts.

I confess that on occasion I’ve written “autobiographical” stories, tales that include some detail or nugget from life, a small touch that adds to the overall atmosphere, a dab of authenticity. Other offerings contain what I would call “emotional truths”, characters reliving some trauma drawn from my convoluted psychological history. Primal terror, feelings of self-loathing and disgust; manic spasms of joy, rapid disillusionment.

I think of older short stories like “Invisible Boy” or “Carl” (from Sex & Other Acts of the Imagination). Raw and edgy. Spare and relentless and credible…and all the more powerful and frightening for that reason.

witingMore recently, my novella “Second Sight” (from Exceptions and Deceptions) features a married couple that bear a strong resemblance to Sherron and I. If you want a semi-accurate portrait of what daily life around Casa Burns is like, check out “Second Sight”. Not a word of it is true, of course, but the couple at the heart of the tale have a depth and subtlety that take the offering to another level.

The unnamed narrator of my last novel, Disloyal Son, is a Canadian writer and some of his genealogy is borrowed from my family history, but Mr. X, candidly, is a lot nicer than me, much more passive and considerate. Yin to my Yang.

It could even be fairly said that I share some traits with my all-time favourite character, Evgeny Nightstalk (So Dark the Night). I certainly manifest Nightstalk’s ferocious loyalty and hair-trigger temper. His twisted moral code is like an externalization of my id.

But while there are definitely similarities, I would argue that none of these characters is really me—they’re all composites, Frankenstein monsters, a jumble of body parts. I made them up. In my humble opinion, working exclusively from real life is boring, not to mention lazy.

The art is in creating individuals and scenarios from dust and mud, shaping them with your own hands, breathing life into them with each word, each sentence.

On those rare occasions when I recognize that I’ve come up with something undeniably original and unique, there’s a thrill of joy and accomplishment that quickens my very soul. It’s the ultimate high. Nothing else I’ve experienced in my creative/artistic life compares to that peak moment.

So put away your diaries and journals, smash every mirror in the vicinity.

Time to write stories that defy expectations and conventions, yarns that even the author cannot control or confine.

Surprise us, amaze us, take us somewhere we haven’t been before.

Make us laugh and cry.

Anger us, if you have the nerve.

Show us a face other than your own.

Angel

2 comments

  1. Mir Fleur

    Now I feel I should sheepishly raise my hand and confess that my blog is an autobiography! (I claim allowance for the fact that this is only a sliver of the writing that I do, and the rest is a wide variety).

    One of the joys of writing, for me, is stepping outside myself and living in a different personality and in new circumstances within my imagination. Aside from supporting the writing of original pieces, I enjoy having a ‘holiday’ from myself. Mir xx

  2. Cliff Burns

    There are many days I could use a holiday from myself.

    Memoir and autobiography are fine…as long as people don’t mistake them for the TRUTH. The truth, as Werner Herzog would say, lies outside the facts, “an accountant’s version” of reality. Some of the greatest insights I’ve gained in my life have come from fiction and poetry, the genius of scribes who can absorb and synthesize the world/universe and through metaphor, allusion and intuition describe the experience of existence and remind us of the grace and glory of Creation.

    Thanks for popping by.

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